Tag Archives: Properties

PDF files and the FILEPREVIEW control

The next release of OpenInsight (version 10.1) includes a couple of updates to the FILEPREVIEW control as a result of using it extensively “out in the field”, and in this post we thought we’d look at these changes and why we made them in case you encounter the same issues yourself.

The Adobe problem

As mentioned in this previous post, the FILEPREVIEW control relies on third-party DLLs to provide “preview handlers” that OpenInsight uses to display the contents of files such as Word or PDF documents. However, what we found is that not all of these handlers are created equal and some can be quite problematic – in our case the Adobe PDF preview handler (supplied with the Adobe PDF Reader) proved to be one of these.

When the handler is loaded by OpenInsight one of the things that must be specified is the context in which it is created – this can be “in-process” (which means it runs in the same address space as OpenInsight) or “out-of-process” (which runs as a separate executable). This is done internally by a set of flags, and when you use the FILENAME property these flags are set to their default values which, until recently, had proved sufficient. However, extensive testing (by Martyn at RevSoft) found that the Adobe PDF preview handler had stopped working, and further investigation revealed that at some point recent versions of this had become sensitive to these context flags, so the first change we made was to provide a new SETFILENAME method, which allows you to set the flags yourself if need be:

The SETFILENAME method

RetVal = Exec_Method( CtrlEntID, "SETFILENAME", FileName, FileExtn, |
                      ContextFlags )
ParameterRequiredDescription
FileNameNoContains the name and path of the file to preview (can be null to remove the preview).
FileExtnNoSpecifies an explicit extension to use, overriding the extension passed in the FileName parameter.
ContextFlagsNoSpecifies a bit-mask of “CLSCTX_” flags used to create the preview handler. Defaults to:

  BitOr( CLSCTX_INPROC_SERVER$, CLSCTX_LOCAL_SERVER$ )

(Equates for these flags can be found in the MSWIN_CLSCTX_EQUATES insert record)

If the returned value is 0 then the operation was successful, otherwise this is an error code reported from Windows and can be passed to the RTI_ErrorText stored procedure to get the details:

E.g.

// Load the PDF in an out-of-process context
$Insert MSWin_ClsCtx_Equates

RetVal = Exec_Method( CtrlEntID, "SETFILENAME", "C:\Temp\Test.PDF", "",
                      CLSCTX_LOCAL_SERVER$ )
If RetVal Then
   // Problem...
   ErrorText = RTI_ErrorText( "WIN", RetVal )
End

Even with this you may still find problems, as the above code was fine for me, but not for Martyn, even though the PDF preview handler worked fine in Windows Explorer itself for both of us! So, we could only conclude that Adobe made sure that the handler worked with the Windows Explorer, but they were less concerned about third party applications (Per-monitor DPI settings are also not supported by the preview handler which is disappointing as well).

The Foxit solution

After some more testing we decided to switch to the Foxit PDF reader which worked as expected, so we would recommend using this for PDF previewing in future if needed.

Removing the FILENAME property at design-time

One other change we made was to remove the FILENAME property from the Form Designer so that it could not be set at design-time due to the following reasons:

  • We had reports that once it had been set it was very difficult to select the control again in the Form Designer, because it basically takes over mouse handling!
  • Document previewing is deemed to more of a run-time operation than a design-time operation.
  • The FILENAME property is deprecated in favor of the SETFILENAME method because the latter provides a more complete API. The FILENAME property is still supported however, and will be going forwards.

Conclusion

So, for v10.1 we have provided a new SETFILENAME method to provide a better interface for file-previewing which gives more feedback and more control, and you should use this in preference to the FILENAME property.

We have also found the Adobe PDF preview handler to be somewhat temperamental in use so would recommend the Foxit preview handler instead if you have problems with the former (Note however, that other preview handlers we use regularly, such as Word, Excel and PowerPoint have all worked well without any issues so far).

Methods, Events, and Documentation

In a recent post we provided a preview of the OpenInsight IMAGE API documentation for the upcoming release of version 10.1. As that proved quite popular we thought we’d provide some more, this time dealing with the Common GUI API (i.e. the basic interface that virtually every GUI object supports) and the WINDOW object API – two core areas of OI GUI programming.

Methods, not Events

One thing you may notice as you look through these documents is the addition of many new methods, such as SHOWOPTIONS or QBFCLOSESESSION – this is an attempt to tidy up the API into a more logical and coherent format that is a better fit for an object-based interface.

As we went through the product in order to document it, it became very apparent that there were many instances where events were being used to mimic methods, such as sending a WRITE event to save the data in a form, or sending a CLICK event to simulate a button click and so on. In object-based terminology this sort of operation would be performed by a method, which is a directive that performs an action – the event is a notification in response to that action. So, for example, you would call a “write” method to save your data and the system would raise a “write” event so you could deal with it.

Of course, this distinction will probably not bother many developers – just API purists like myself, but this does have another advantage if you like to use Object Notation Syntax (I do) – you can now perform actions such as reading and writing form data by using the”->” notation, whereas before you would have to use the Send_Event stored procedure which essentially breaks the object-based paradigm.

So instead of:

   Call Send_Event( @Window, "WRITE" )

you would use the form’s WRITEROW method instead:

   @@Window->WriteRow( "" )

which is a more natural fit for this style of programming.

(It is also easier to explain to new OI programmers who are used to other object-based languages and environments where everything is properties, methods and events).

Methods, not Stored Procedures

This brings us finally onto the topic of Stored Procedures and the object API, where several of these also fulfill the role of methods. For example, take the venerable Msg stored procedure used to display a message box for a parent form – a different way of treating this would be to have a SHOWMESSAGE method for the parent form rather than using a “raw” Msg call. Likewise for starting a new form: instead of using the raw Start_Window procedure, the SYSTEM and WINDOW objects now support a STARTFORM method instead.

Of course, none of this changes your existing code, nor is it enforced, it’s just something you can use if and when you wish to. However, even if my API pedantry hasn’t persuaded you to change your coding style, some of the new methods are worth investigating as they provide a better opportunity for us to extend the product’s functionality further – take a look at the WINDOW READROW and WRITEROW methods for an example of this – they support new features that we couldn’t do with just sending events.

In any case, here are the links – hopefully some light reading for your weekend!

Reordering tabs with the AllowDragReorder property

The next release of OpenInsight includes a new TABCONTROL property called ALLOWDRAGREORDER, which allows you to drag a tab to a new position within the control. It’s a simple boolean property, and when set to True tabs may be dragged and reordered with the mouse – an image of the tab is moved with the cursor, and a pair of arrows are displayed to mark the potential insertion point.

Here’s an example of a tab being dragged in the IDE:

Shows a image of the IDE with a tab being dragged by a cursor, along with the drag0image and the insertion marker arrows.

Bonus trivia

  • The tabs may be scrolled while dragging by hovering outside either edge of the control.
  • This property is not supported for:
    • MultiLine tab controls
    • Vertically-aligned tab controls
  • The LISTBOX control also supports this property for reordering its items – see the “Order Tabs” dialog in the Form Designer for an example, or the list of types in the IDE’s “Open Entity” dialog.

The IMAGE Object API (Redux)

Once upon a time, in a blog post far far away, we looked at a very early incarnation of the version 10 Image API which described how images were used with OpenInsight forms and controls. Since then the API has changed quite a bit, so this post gives you a PDF link to a preview of the API documentation which covers the capabilities in the next release, some of which hasn’t been described before.

An overview of the Image API

Many GUI types managed by the Presentation Server support images in one form or another; some have background images, some have glyphs, some have image lists and so on. However, many of these images have properties of their own, and in most cases these image properties are common to all.

Because of this most Presentation Server types that support images expose them as intrinsic “sub-objects”, thorough a model we refer to as the “Image Object API”. The image object’s lifetime is managed by the system and it cannot be programmatically destroyed from Basic+, but it can be manipulated by the Get/Set_Property and Exec_Method functions just like any other Presentation Server object.

The entire Image API is described in the linked PDF below but be aware that not all image objects support all of the API. For example, a PUSHBUTTON type does not support an “INDEX” property for its background image, and its SplitGlyph image doesn’t support an ALIGN property: All such exceptions are documented in the relevant sections that describe each object type.

Supported image types

The Presentation Server supports the following image types via the WIC (Windows Imaging Component) sub-sytem:

  • BMP
  • ICO
  • PNG
  • GIF
  • JPEG
  • TIFF

Image Object Properties

NameDescription
ALIGNSpecifies the horizontal and vertical alignment of the image
within its parent.
AUTOSCALESpecifies if the image should be scaled along with its parent
object.
COLORKEYSpecifies the color in the image that should be treated as the
“transparent color”.
COUNTSpecifies the number of sub-images within an image file.
FILENAMEReturns the name of the image file being displayed.
FILENAMESSpecifies an array of DPI-specific image files to display.
FRAMECOUNTReturns the number of “frames” within an image.
FRAMEDELAYReturns the delay time in milliseconds for a multi-frame image.
FRAMEINDEXSpecifies the frame to display within a multi-frame image.
INDEXSpecifies the index of the sub-image to display within a multiimage file.
OFFSETSpecifies the point within the image (not the object) to begin
drawing from.
ORIGINSpecifies the point within the object (not the image) to begin
drawing from.
SIZEReturns the width and height of the image in pixels
STYLESpecifies how the image is drawn into an object (Tiled,
Stretched, Clipped or Scaled).
TRANSLUCENCYSpecifies the degree of transparency applied to an image when
it is drawn

Image Object Methods

NameDescription
SAVETOFILESaves the current image to a file.
SETHBITMAPLoads an image from a Windows BITMAP handle (HBITMAP).
SETIMAGELoads an image from an array of “raw” image bytes.
SETREPOSIMAGESpecifies the image file(s) using an OpenInsight repository
IMAGE entity.

Here’s the link to the Image Object API PDF – adding animated GIFs to your applications has never been so easy!

OLE Control improvements in v10.0.8

We added quite a bit of design-time functionality for OLE controls in v10.0.8 so this post provides a quick overview of what’s new:

The CLSID property

This property has a new “editor” dialog.  While it doesn’t allow you to change the CLSID (that’s by design – if you change the CLSID it’s a totally different control!) it does provide you with a lot of information about the control question such as it’s Registry attributes and it’s properties, methods and events, e.g:

OLE Control CLSID General Tab

OLE Control CLSID Properties Tab

OLE Control CLSID Methods Tab

OLE Control CLSID Events Tab

The QualifiedOleEvents property

This property has a new editor that allows you to specify which OLE events you wish to qualify when the control is created, hopefully removing the need for you to do this in code:

OLE Control QualifiedOleEvents Editor

The OLE Properties section

We’ve also added a new category called “OLE” to the properties displayed in the IDE Property Panel, and this contains all of the design-time OLE properties that can be edited for the control:

OLE Properties in the IDE Property Panel

You may also notice that we’ve added some property type-support for editing OLE properties here as well:

  • Color properties can now use the standard Color property editor
  • Fonts can now be edited with the standard Windows Font dialog
  • Enumerated types are edited with a dropdown list showing the “internal” and “external values, e.g:

OLE Enumerated Properties dropdown

Hopefully this will make working with OLE controls and OpenInsight 10 easier for you in the future.

Adding Custom Properties in the Form Designer

User-defined properties (“UDPs”) have always been supported at run-time in OpenInsight by giving the desired property a name prefixed with an “@” symbol and then setting a value for it, e.g:

Call Set_Property( CtrlEntID, "@MYPROP_1", "SomeVal" )
Call Set_Property( CtrlEntID, "@MYPROP_2", "SomethingElse" )

Value = Get_Property( CtrlEntID, "@MYPROP_1" )

// etc...

With the upcoming release of version 10.0.8, design-time support for these has been added in the Form Designer via the new “CustomProperties” property.  This is simply a list of UDP  property names and values that can be specified and stored in the Form definition record, which are then processed during form creation to create UDPs that can be accessed in the normal way by Get_Property and Set_Property.

For example, if you enter a couple of custom properties in the Form Designer called MYPROP_1 and MYPROP_2:

CustomProperties Property

Editing the CustomProperties property

You may then use these with Get_Property and Set_Property at runtime, by referencing them with an “@” prefix (i.e. “@MYPROP_1” and “@MYPROP_2”) like so:

// Value will contain "SomethingElse"
Value = Get_Property( CtrlEntID, "@MYPROP_2" )

Two things to note:

1) You don’t need to specify an “@” prefix for the property name in the CustomProperties editor, and

2) You are not limited to simple strings when entering CustomProperties values – you may also use the standard “[,]” syntax for entering dynamic arrays just like you would for QuickEvent parameters:

E.g. to enter an @fm-delimited array you enclose the list of items in ‘[]’ brackets, and delimit them with a comma like so:

An array like this: 

   <1> ItemOne
   <2> ItemTwo

Can be entered as:

   ['ItemOne','ItemTwo']

Note that each array item must be single-quoted, but you can escape a quote in the data by using two single quotes, e.g.

An array like 

   <1> ItemOne
   <2> ItemTwo's Stuff

Can be entered as:

   ['ItemOne','ItemTwo''s Stuff']

For arrays with lower-level delimiters like @vm and @svm you add a set of nested ”[]’ brackets for each level, e.g:

An array like:
   <1>      ItemOne
   <2,1>    ItemTwo_A
   <2,2>    ItemTwo_B
   <2,3,1>  ItemTwo_C_1
   <2,3,2>  ItemTwo_C_2
   <3>      ItemThree

Can be entered as:
   
   ['ItemOne',['ItemTwoA','ItemTwoB',['ItemTwo_C_1','ItemTwo_C_2']],'ItemThree']

And so on.

Hopefully you find this new feature useful and help to reduce the amount of code you need to write.

A focus on the FOCUS property

There are two methods for setting the input focus in OpenInsight, and there is a subtle implementation difference that can impact your applications if you’re not careful how you apply them.

The first method is to use an object’s own FOCUS property and set it to TRUE$ like so:

Call Set_Property_Only( @Window : ".EDL_SURNAME", "FOCUS", TRUE$ )

This moves the focus to the specified object, but the event queue will be flushed both before and after the focus has been set, thereby preventing any events raised as a result of the focus being moved from being processed.  This method was originally designed for use with validation routines so the focus could be reset to an invalid control “safely”.

The second method is to use the SYSTEM object’s FOCUS property:

Call Set_Property_Only( "SYSTEM", "FOCUS", @Window : ".EDL_SURNAME" )

This moves the focus, but any events triggered as a result of moving the focus (like LOSTFOCUS and GOTFOCUS events) will be processed.

That all sounds straightforward enough, but using the first method can lead to unexpected results if you are relying on an event already in the queue that you subsequently need – not a common situation but one we encountered recently while converting an old form to v10.  In our case we had a menu failing to show when the focus was on a specific control, and it turned out that the LOSTFOCUS event for the control was setting it’s FOCUS property to TRUE$.  This had the effect of killing a pending MENUDROPDOWN event (new in v10) that created the menu to display, hence no menu.

In this case the solution is to use the SYSTEM BLOCKEVENTS property to turn off events being triggered while the focus is moved and then restore event processing afterwards:

Call Set_Property_Only( "SYSTEM", "BLOCKEVENTS", TRUE$ )
Call Set_Property_Only( "SYSTEM", "FOCUS", @Window : ".EDL_SURNAME" )
Call Set_Property_Only( "SYSTEM", "BLOCKEVENTS", FALSE$ )

This prevented any LOSTFOCUS and GOTFOCUS events from being raised, but the MENUDROPDOWN event was still in the queue.

Using the SYSTEM FOCUS and BLOCKEVENTS properties in this way is a far “safer” alternative when moving the focus because you have full control over how events are handled, and I would always advocate using this method over using a control’s own FOCUS property.

 

Coloring your tabs with the ITEMSTYLE property

A new facility introduced in version 10 is the ability to set the styling information for the tabs in the TabControl using the new ITEMSTYLE and ITEMSTYLES properties, and in this post we’ll explain how to use them.

TabStates and ItemStyles

Each tab in a TabControl can be in one of the following states at runtime:

  • Normal (Unselected tab)
  • Hot (Mouse is over a Normal tab)
  • Disabled
  • Selected
  • Hot Selected (Mouse is over the selected tab)

And for each one of these states you can specify the following styling information for the tabs:

  • ForeColor
  • BackColorFrom
  • BackColorTo
  • Bold
  • Italic
  • Underline
  • Translucency
  • CloseButton ForeColor
  • CloseButton BackColor

To do this at run-time you can use one of the following properties:

  • The ITEMSTYLE property
  • The ITEMSTYLES property

and we’ll take a look at each of these in turn.

 

The ITEMSTYLE property

   prevStyle = Get_Property( ctrlEntID, "ITEMSTYLE", itemState )
   currStyle = Set_Property( ctrlEntID, "ITEMSTYLE", newStyle, itemState )

This property allows you to get or set the ITEMSTYLE for a single state.  The property itself is an @fm-delimited array of styling information like so:

    <1> ForeColor             (COLORREF)
    <2> BackColor From        (COLORREF)
    <3> BackColor To          (COLORREF)
    <4> Bold                  (1/0)
    <5> Italic                (1/0)
    <6> Underline             (1/0)
    <7> Translucency          (0-100)
    <8> CloseButton ForeColor (COLORREF)
    <9> CloseButton BackColor (COLORREF)

Equates for these array positions can be found in the PS_TABCONTROL_EQUATES insert record:

   equ TCIS_POS_FORECOLOR$           to 1 ; * // COLORREF
   equ TCIS_POS_BACKCOLOR_FROM$      to 2 ; * // COLORREF
   equ TCIS_POS_BACKCOLOR_TO$        to 3 ; * // COLORREF
   equ TCIS_POS_BOLD$                to 4 ; * // Boolean
   equ TCIS_POS_ITALIC$              to 5 ; * // Boolean
   equ TCIS_POS_UNDERLINE$           to 6 ; * // Boolean
   equ TCIS_POS_TRANSLUCENCY$        to 7 ; * // UInt (0-100)
   equ TCIS_POS_CLOSEBTNFORECOLOR$   to 8 ; * // COLORREF
   equ TCIS_POS_CLOSEBTNBACKCOLOR$   to 9 ; * // COLORREF

You must also use the index parameter with the Get_Property and Set_Property to specify the tab state that you are setting, which is an integer between 1 and 5:

   equ TCIS_NORMAL$                   to 1
   equ TCIS_HOT$                      to 2
   equ TCIS_DISABLED$                 to 3
   equ TCIS_SELECTED$                 to 4
   equ TCIS_HOTSELECTED$              to 5

Example: Setting the Hot and Hot Selected styles

   $insert colors
   $insert logical

   // Set the mouseover text to change to red 
   itemStyle = ""
   itemStyle<TCIS_POS_FORECOLOR$> = RED$
   
   Call Set_Property_Only( ctrlEntID, "ITEMSTYLE", |
                           itemStyle,              |
                           TCIS_HOT$ )

   // Set the mouseover text for a selected item to change to red
   // and bold
   itemStyle = ""
   itemStyle<TCIS_POS_FORECOLOR$> = RED$
   itemStyle<TCIS_POS_BOLD$>      = TRUE$
   
   Call Set_Property_Only( ctrlEntID, "ITEMSTYLE", |
                           itemStyle,              |
                           TCIS_HOTSELECTED$ )

 

The ITEMSTYLES property

   prevStyles = Get_Property( ctrlEntID, "ITEMSTYLES" ) 
   currStyles = Set_Property( ctrlEntID, "ITEMSTYLES", newStyles )

This property is very similar to the ITEMSTYLE property except that it allows you to get or set the styles for all states at once.

The property itself is an @fm/@vm delimited array: each state is delimited by @fm, and the styling information for each state is delimited by @vm.

   <1> ItemStyle for the Normal State
   <2> ItemStyle for the Hot State
   <3> ItemStyle for the Disabled State
   <4> ItemStyle for the Selected State
   <5> ItemStyle for the Hot Selected State

(You will note these map onto the “TCIS_” state equates shown above)

For each one of these states the ItemStyle information is an @vm delimited array using the same structure as for the ITEMSTYLE property, i.e:

   <0,1> ForeColor             (COLORREF)
   <0,2> BackColor From        (COLORREF) 
   <0,3> BackColor To          (COLORREF) 
   <0,4> Bold                  (1/0) 
   <0,5> Italic                (1/0) 
   <0,6> Underline             (1/0) 
   <0,7> Translucency          (0-100) 
   <0,8> CloseButton ForeColor (COLORREF) 
   <0,9> CloseButton BackColor (COLORREF)

So you can use the “TCIS_POS_” equates shown above as well.

Example: Setting the Hot and Hot Selected styles using ITEMSTYLES

   $insert colors
   $insert logical

   itemStyles = Get_Property( ctrlEntID, "ITEMSTYLES" )

   // Set the mouseover text to change to red 
   itemStyles<TCIS_HOT$, TCIS_POS_FORECOLOR$> = RED$
   
   // Set the mouseover text for a selected item to change to red 
   // and bold
   itemStyles<TCIS_HOTSELECTED$,TCIS_POS_FORECOLOR$> = RED$
   itemStyles<TCIS_HOTSELECTED$,TCIS_POS_BOLD$>      = TRUE$
   
   Call Set_Property_Only( ctrlEntID, "ITEMSTYLES", itemStyles )

 

Setting ItemStyles in the Form Designer

Item styling for the tab control can also be specified at design time by using the “ItemStyles” property that is available when you select the tab control in the form designer.  When you click the button for this property you will see an ItemStyles editor dialog that lets you specify the styling information:

TabControl ItemStyles Editor

(Note that in the current release (10.0.6) you will not see this applied to the design control – this will be fixed in an upcoming release)

Tracking the SAVEWARN property

As veteran OpenInsight programmers know, the system uses a simple boolean flag (exposed as the SAVEWARN property) to determine if the contents of a data-bound form have changed.  This flag can be updated in several ways, the most common being:

  • From the LOSTFOCUS event of a control.
  • From the POSCHANGED, INSERTROW and DELETEROW events of an EDITTABLE control.
  • From setting a control’s DEFPROP property.
  • From the CLOSE event of a form when the control with focus is inspected to see if it has changed.

It is checked during the CLEAR and CLOSE events to see if it has been set and an “Unsaved Changes” warning issued to the user if so.  Most of the time this system works quite well, but (as anyone who has spent several years working with OI systems knows) sometimes it gets triggered when you least expect it, and you’re left with no clue as to why.

To help with this situation the next version of OpenInsight introduces SAVEWARN tracking, so you can see which parts of the system update the SAVEWARN property and when they actually do it. In previous versions the system updated the SAVEWARN flag directly (it’s a simple variable in the “window common area”) but this has been changed to use the Set_Property function so it can be monitored effectively from a single point.

To track SAVEWARN you have two choices:

  • Use the SYSMSG event
  • Use the System Monitor

 

Using the SYSMSG event to track SAVEWARN

Every time SAVEWARN is set a standard SYSMSG event is raised with a SAVEWARNINFO code; the system itself does nothing with this message, but it’s there for you to use if you wish.  This option is probably more suited for run-time tracing as it’s something you could add to your applications easily if you needed to.

The PS_EQUATES insert record defines the SAVEWARNINFO message number that you can intercept:

equ SYSMSG_SAVEWARNINFO$ to 21  ; // Save warn has been changed - null msg

The Auxiliary parameter passed to the  SYSMSG event contains information that describes why the SAVEWARN property was changed.

 

Using the System Monitor to track SAVEWARN

The SetDebugger() function has been updated to support a new method called “SAVEWARN” that enables SAVEWARN tracking so that changes are displayed in the System Monitor.  This option is probably more suited to development use rather than run-time.

From the System Monitor execute:

setdebugger savewarn 1

to turn on tracing, and:

setdebugger savewarn 0

to turn it off.

E.g:

SAVEWARN tracing in the System Monitor

SAVEWARN tracing in the System Monitor

Setting the SAVEWARN property

If you wish to set SAVEWARN yourself you may use the “index” parameter to pass a description for the change, so this can be picked up in any tracing scenario like so:

Call Set_Property_Only( @Window, "SAVEWARN", TRUE$, "From My Stuff" )

This description is then passed in the Auxiliary parameter of the  SYSMSG event as noted above.

 

Hopefully you will find this facility useful if you ever suffer from problems with SAVEWARN in the future.

EditTables – The Sub-Object Interface

One of the changes we wanted to make with EditTables in v10 was to expose all of their runtime functionality easily through the normal property/method API.  Some of this was already available in previous versions, but usually involved a method to set a plethora of style bits, which is not really satisfactory unless you’re a C++ programmer (as we have been reminded by various developers on several occasions!).

Besides the EditTable as a whole, there are essentially three other main programmable areas:

  1. Columns
  2. Rows
  3. Cells

Providing unique properties and methods to address the capabilities of these areas is not really practicable, as it leads to an “explosion” of property names: For example, accessing the “text” associated with each of these would require three new properties such as:

  • COLUMNTEXT
  • ROWTEXT
  • CELLTEXT

Of course that’s only three, but considering that each of the aforementioned areas has something like 30 properties, you would suddenly add 90+ new property names to the product!  Bear in mind also that columns, rows and cells each have many properties like TEXT in common, so a new name for each of these seems extremely wasteful and unnecessary.

(We could also have used something similar like the existing TEXTBYPOS method to achieve this, but then we’d have 30’ish new “BYPOS” methods instead, and methods aren’t properties anyway).

So, to keep the property namespace under control we decided to use this commonality and implement a set of  “sub-objects” instead, one for each area.  Unsurprisingly these are named:

  • COLUMNS
  • ROWS
  • CELLS  

Each of these sub-objects are indexed and can be used to access a specific column, row or cell in the EditTable.  They all share many common properties and methods, but also expose a few type-specific ones as well.   As an example, this is how to set the CUEBANNER property for each sub-object:

ctrlEntID  = @window : ".EDT_TEST"
cueBanner  = "Test"

// Set the CUEBANNER for the second column
call set_Property( ctrlEntID : ".COLUMNS", "CUEBANNER", cueBanner, 2 )
// Set the CUEBANNER for the third row
call set_Property( ctrlEntID : ".ROWS", "CUEBANNER", cueBanner, 3 )

// Set the CUEBANNER for the cell at column 5, row 7
call set_Property( ctrlEntID : ".CELLS", "CUEBANNER", cueBanner, 5 : @fm : 7 )

// And here's the same using Object Notation Syntax
@ctrlEntID.columns{2}->cueBannner = cueBanner
@ctrlEntID.rows{3}->cueBannner    = cueBanner
@ctrlEntID.cells{5,7}->cueBannner = cueBanner

We’ll take a look at each of these sub-objects in turn over the next few posts to examine their functionality in more detail.